Menu
header photo

A Mobile Odyssey

Website Translater

Free Website Translator

Search

Blog Posts

January 2021

February 2021

 

 

The month is half over and we are still waiting for the part to show up all the way from England, and naturally the delay is blamed on COVID!
 
During the down time we have kept busy with little jobs around the boat and perfecting our solar use!
Our boat is now compl…

Read more

Boat and RV December 14 (Free vs Paid)

Boat and RV

December 14, 2019

Conestoga Charlie is breaking with the general format today.

There are 22 photos and not in the order of travel but rather in the order of amenities.

I was reading a piece about a very bad commercial campground experience, qnd thinking back I remembered some…

Read more

July 2019

Boat and RV

July 1, 2019

Conestoga Charlie with general ramblings and more about our Solar experiment!

This is the second day in Cabin Creek which is really easy access off the I-90  Exit 63 and even comfortable for a class A! (GPS Lat 47.2933 Lon -121.2877)

Something that is troubling …

Read more

June 2019

Boat and RV

June 1, 2019

Conestoga Charlie here with two more files for new and potential owners. And if all works well they will be posted in order!?

New Owner File 3

Another aspect of purchase is learning how to operate all the systems.

Our dealer provided a “run through” of how it …

Read more

May 2019

Boat and RV

May 3, 2019

Conestoga Charlie and crew welcome the new members to our group.

The group is growing nicely and so far appears to be well balanced between Campers and Boaters.

Many travel by both so hopefully in the near future we will see more travel stories posted by our membe…

Read more

April 2019

Boat and RV

April 2, 2019

Conestoga Charlie heading south after Oklahoma City and visit to the Route 66 Museum.

Thankfully nothing but normal traffic problems on the way to friends in McKinney Texas.

With one stopover in Ardmore Oklahoma to mail a package we arrived on a nice sunny day w…

Read more

March 2019

Boat and RV

March 2, 2019

Conestoga Charlie sitting in Tucson still.

Today I am going to talk about money!

Not the green stuff we need for day to day living and travel, but the reserves we need for emergencies.

Most will carry a specified amount in a savings type of account that can b…

Read more

February 2019

Boat and RV

February 5, 2019

Conestoga Charlie back after a few days of intense packing!

One of the many things people say during our travels it how much they would enjoy the free lifestyle, however they also lament about how much stuff they have.

Those readers who are contemplating a mo…

Read more

January 2019

Boat and RV

January 1, 2019

A big welcome to 2019 from Conestoga Charlie and the crew of the Dawn Treader.

We wish to thank all the loyal readers for their encouragement and support.

Today’s special New Year’s Blog is a walk down memory lane.  It is a short picture story of the Odyssey i…

Read more

July 2018

Mystery Blog

Suggestions have been pouring in (well more like a trickle really) for the new name.

On July 4th it will be one whole month since we left our boat and headed up Interstate 75 with the Gulfstream BT Cruiser, a 23 foot Class C Motor Home.

During the last few weeks I have been com…

Read more

View older posts »

To better view this site on a smaller device, Please turn your device.

 

You are visitor number

24112

Blog Posts

January 2021

February 2021

 

 

The month is half over and we are still waiting for the part to show up all the way from England, and naturally the delay is blamed on COVID!
 
During the down time we have kept busy with little jobs around the boat and perfecting our solar use!
Our boat is now compl…

Read more

Boat and RV December 14 (Free vs Paid)

Boat and RV

December 14, 2019

Conestoga Charlie is breaking with the general format today.

There are 22 photos and not in the order of travel but rather in the order of amenities.

I was reading a piece about a very bad commercial campground experience, qnd thinking back I remembered some…

Read more

July 2019

Boat and RV

July 1, 2019

Conestoga Charlie with general ramblings and more about our Solar experiment!

This is the second day in Cabin Creek which is really easy access off the I-90  Exit 63 and even comfortable for a class A! (GPS Lat 47.2933 Lon -121.2877)

Something that is troubling …

Read more

June 2019

Boat and RV

June 1, 2019

Conestoga Charlie here with two more files for new and potential owners. And if all works well they will be posted in order!?

New Owner File 3

Another aspect of purchase is learning how to operate all the systems.

Our dealer provided a “run through” of how it …

Read more

May 2019

Boat and RV

May 3, 2019

Conestoga Charlie and crew welcome the new members to our group.

The group is growing nicely and so far appears to be well balanced between Campers and Boaters.

Many travel by both so hopefully in the near future we will see more travel stories posted by our membe…

Read more

April 2019

Boat and RV

April 2, 2019

Conestoga Charlie heading south after Oklahoma City and visit to the Route 66 Museum.

Thankfully nothing but normal traffic problems on the way to friends in McKinney Texas.

With one stopover in Ardmore Oklahoma to mail a package we arrived on a nice sunny day w…

Read more

March 2019

Boat and RV

March 2, 2019

Conestoga Charlie sitting in Tucson still.

Today I am going to talk about money!

Not the green stuff we need for day to day living and travel, but the reserves we need for emergencies.

Most will carry a specified amount in a savings type of account that can b…

Read more

February 2019

Boat and RV

February 5, 2019

Conestoga Charlie back after a few days of intense packing!

One of the many things people say during our travels it how much they would enjoy the free lifestyle, however they also lament about how much stuff they have.

Those readers who are contemplating a mo…

Read more

January 2019

Boat and RV

January 1, 2019

A big welcome to 2019 from Conestoga Charlie and the crew of the Dawn Treader.

We wish to thank all the loyal readers for their encouragement and support.

Today’s special New Year’s Blog is a walk down memory lane.  It is a short picture story of the Odyssey i…

Read more

July 2018

Mystery Blog

Suggestions have been pouring in (well more like a trickle really) for the new name.

On July 4th it will be one whole month since we left our boat and headed up Interstate 75 with the Gulfstream BT Cruiser, a 23 foot Class C Motor Home.

During the last few weeks I have been com…

Read more

View older posts »

June 2018 "The Begining"

Sailboat to Motor Home

Day 1 June 4, 2018

The First Day of the motor home journey was June 4, 2018! We bought our first motor home on May 15th

Having lived aboard a sailboat since 2003 many of the things were familiar still we considered ourselves “newbees” to RV’s, so join us and we will discover the world of RV living together!

The reason we bought a motor home is because we did not have a vehicle capable of towing a Travel Trailer or 5th Wheel. Like boats there are advantages and disadvantages to each.

We also chose to sell our 07 Mustang Convertible as it had 200+K miles and the added cost of rigging it to tow was prohibitive both for money and time line for departure. Understandably that decision is going to make some things inconvenient, but simpler during trips.

The first hurdle is the purchase process.

The decision to buy new, used, from a private party, or dealer will depend on many factors and they are all related to how many little green things are in the wallet.

Most dealers have some type of warranty on used units, because of the age of ours (2004) our dealer provided a check of all systems and provided a “Camp Ready” guarantee which was basically that all appliances were in working order. This guarantee was good tell the end of the driveway!

This is still better than anything from a private party, and if it is a “first purchase” may be the better way to go.

Buying from a private party may save in the short term however, a good suggestion is to have a cash reserve and or skills to cover repair or replace for major systems. We had that issue with our sailboat even though it was surveyed; there were major problems that the survey missed!

Financing is the other important decision. I will state unequivocally that cash is best.

 Many dealers offer 15 to 20 year financing. This is inviting on the surface, however the interest rates are terrible, and the fact that an RV is a depreciating item, just may turn out to have payments on n RV that is no longer useable.

There are other better options, a credit union, bank, or second mortgage. It would be a good idea to secure pre-approved financing.

We spent our first night in Columbia County Rest Area, Florida, after dinner and first fill up of the trip in Ocala. A Texaco station was handy so we filled up ($109)! Thinking about the fuel cost, I can’t help thinking about how far I can sail on $100.

One more detail, Roadside Assistance!

RV towing like boat tow is not usually covered in standard coverage. One of the photos shows our boat being towed when we had a serious engine problem. That tow would have cost a little over $2300 had we not had insurance. 

We started out our RV experience with a 3 year Membership in Good Sam when we bought ours. I’ve heard since there may be better.

The stop at Wal-Mart provided the first modifications to the motor home.  LED Replacement bulbs and a 750 Watt Inverter was purchased to add to Boondocking capability

This should be enough to get started, more post will follow, so join the adventure.

Sailboat to Motor Home

Day Two June 5

 

Sitting and enjoying the view of Wal-Mart’s parking lot while Dawn cooks breakfast, Day 3 and about to post yesterday’s Account!

Today before setting off, an old Reader’s Digest book, “On The Road USA, was consulted.

Many years ago I sent for this set that has sightseeing venues within a few minutes of the Interstates.

Along our intended route, I-75 there was 2 notable destinations. One was the Ola Barber Pitman house in Valdosta. The other was Georgia Agrarama, Tifton GA.

Getting a late start (we’re on Vacation!) We arrived just about lunch time in Valdosta, and found the building. It was all locked up and there was no evidence that it ever had anything to do with the first Coca-Cola Bottling.

We walked over to the courthouse and found a security guard to inquire about it. No one had a clue except that it once was used as the County Seat.

Amazing that people living and working literally within a block of a historic structure have no clue of the significance!

Bennies Alley was a nifty dedication.

Next up was heading to a dump station. This is the second time.

Thankfully not at all like Robin William’s movie RV!

In our sailboat we have similar issues. Sounds worse than it really is, but there is no dumping within a 3 mile limit.

Pump out stations on shore literally must “suck” it out of the boat.

There is a special deck fitting for this purpose.

The next stop was Tifton GA, for the Agrirama, which was just closing as we arrived; we did manage to obtain some Genuine Old Fashioned Stone Ground Grits $3.50 for what may be a year’s supply! It will be a noted stop for the return trip.

Atlanta was a big traffic jam, and the planned stop was closed. The next rest area was farther than we wanted to go, so we “camped” overnight at Wal-Mart. Because it was so late we walked to what must be the worse Chinese Buffet in my experience.

Observations:

Much of life in a motor home is quite similar to life on a boat. I must admit our 37 foot sailboat is more convenient than the 23 foot motor home, however a 30+ foot motor home would have the missing appointments. We opted for the size we have because it is an addition not a replacement for the sailboat and we don’t mind tripping over each other.

Our rig is a Gulfstream BT Cruiser 23 foot. It doesn’t have an overhead so we fold the beds up and down every day. I suspect if we were going to make our home full time we would opt for a larger model. However I personally do not feel the need to go much larger.

Our next stop is Chattanooga because we discovered a water leak from our house tank hose and I think it’s covered in the 30 day warranty, We Hope!

We still have not fully used the capabilities of the motor home yet and it is more fun than hurricane season in Florida!


Sailboat to Motor Home

Day Three June 6

 

Woke up to the beautiful Calhoun, GA Wal-Mart and discovered our house water tank appears to be leaking. All the hoses run under the motor home so it appears our next stop will be Camping World in Chattanooga, Tennessee which is about 36 miles away.

Hopefully we have a 30 day warranty on the problem.

Arriving at Camping World in Chattanooga Tennessee we realized that we left our sales contract and invoice back at the boat in Florida.

We were prepared for a gigantic hassle and big bill. What a pleasant surprise.

The whole thing was fixed and ready to go when Dawn noticed a big screw in the front tire picked up in their lot.

So they ordered a set and gave us a free one day pass for the campground (Good Sam) next door.

My first experience hooking up the city water and sewer connections:

Water pressure regulator; check!

Sewer hose secured; check!

Buy special elbow for hose to be secure in pipe; check

Turn on water and watch water run down tire; check, no wait not check!

So wondering what the devil was going on now, I took the panel off and discovered the hose to the plumbing was wrapped in a plastic bag with a plug on the end. Simple for a change, remove plug and reattach to hose outlet. No more leak.

So, Dawn is now cooking tacos for dinner and we are going to rest up for the night.

Boat similarities, you betcha!  Just before we brought the boat down to Port Charlotte, the inner water valve started leaking. It is similar to a regular faucet and used to turn on and off the city water supply.

Replace washers; right! Wrong, the unit went obsolete. Therefore, the lines had to be removed at a junction so the valve could be placed in a vise so the copper lines would not be twisted off and the entire water supply line replaced.

Then a new valve shutoff could be installed.

The photos show our campsite didn’t bother to take photos of the Wal-Mart parking lot, Figured they mostly look the same so just imagine our little motor home in the middle next time you shop.

Hopefully, the next stop will be better. (Are we having fun yet?)

 


Sailboat to Motor Home

Day Four June 7

 

To boat or not to boat, that may be the question, however sitting in Tennessee waiting for our tires to be replaced.

Veteran RV’ers probably are aware of it but I must mention it because it could be an issue.

We were informed that our tires' age was more important than the usable tread. 

There were two couples in big Class A’s that had near disaster due to blowout.

One rig had 7 year old tires that looked almost new and caused over $100,000 damage to a $500,000+ Motor Coach because of a front tire failing.

For our safety, the shop is replacing all -even though only one had a screw in it, so:

$1460+ of unplanned expense.

That’s not much different than boating.  Some friends aboard their boat (SV Pear Lee) intended to sail off to the Islands today but had to return because of an overheating engine.

We, ourselves, had many unplanned expenses over the last 3 years.

We had planned a road trip earlier, however, Hurricane Irma destroyed our Volkswagen Westfailia. After we got stalled in the boatyard, because of engine and transmission troubles, we decided to attempt to get a small motor home and escape the hurricane season. In no way are we abandoning the sailboat just postponing it.

While in Camp Jordan Park, in Chattanooga, Tennessee, it was discovered the city water fitting had been detached. No big deal, unscrew the place, hook it back up, did stuff on the boat like this all the time.

However the next morning after filling the water tank that had the drain valve replaced, Dawn turned on the water pump and it gushed out the side of the RV!

The check valve is defective, temporally placed a plug in the hose outlet until the proper check valve can be located.

The computer system was down for almost 3 hours at the Shop and they could not collect our money for the tires, so once again we were not going to make our planned stop for the night.

Yes, this happens constantly when sailing. Not necessarily Computer glitches but many other reasons.

Also once again the Interstate Rest Stop was closed to overnight parking, so down the road to Uncle Pete’s Truck Stop, in Lebanon, Tennessee.

Not exactly your 4 star camp opportunities, but safe and we’re tired.

Dawn is doing Shrimp Tacos for tonight and we will have a Corona!

Actually things are really pretty good; all is well, so see you tomorrow!


Sailboat to Motor Home

Day Five June 8

 

The wonderful motor home experience we planned has yet to happen.

This is much the same for many aboard boats.

This does not mean it has not been interesting and even fun.

Dawn has such a positive demeanor and finds many things relatively funny, such as watching me get drenched because the water connection went nowhere!

Many a sailing journey has ended with one of the partners, upon landing, saying “I don’t care what you do with the boat, I’m flying home.”

Dawn and I have never been more than 37 feet apart for 6 years now, except for a few times when she did laundry, and my bypass surgery.

Most of the time we did our laundry together anyway.

 

Adapting to the motor home was not especially hard for us, as far as our personal relationship.

The frustrations come from having things foul up! Quite frankly we were trying to get a vacation from that, as our boat has had constant rebuilding for 3 years.

Dawn had experience living on her boat before we met, and I have sailed from Acapulco to Seattle.

On a sailboat, there are many, many miles of nothing but ocean.

At least in the motor home there are interesting things, even if it is just passing scenery.

Just like in the cruising world, it is the people that make it most interesting.

Like the couple sharing the waiting room with us yesterday, he was 76, and was still going great. They were very interesting and he had started as s barber and before retiring had a 9 chair barber salon, a used car lot, and had sold Real Estate.

They were the ones that had a tire cause over $100,000 damage to their coach.

 

Leaving Chattanooga, nothing happened. NO problems and no worries.

Having heard about a great GPS specifically for RV’s, we traded in the Garmin for the Rand McNally RV-ND-7.

It’ll be at least 5 years learning to use it. I think it can call ahead for reservations, save the world’s forest, and a host of other things I don’t know how to do yet.

I’m still arguing with my new computer and I have had it 4 months.

Right off the bat, I did notice one enduring feature, the GPS lists every rest stop and parking spot imaginable.

The other feature is that the type of RV, height, weight, number of propane bottles and capacity, are all able to be recorded.  I’m sure it will save some grief. (UPDATE: Take some advice…DON’T PURCHASE THIS GPS unless you want to be irritated for the rest of your travels! Dtd August 20, 2019)

 

Nashville, TN was the lunch stop, then to Jackson and the Casey Jones Railroad Museum.

Lots of memorabilia, a film about the train accident and the engineer himself.

Outside of the museum, there is a replica of the “Ten Wheeler” that Casey had the accident in.

This was probably one of the most famous “Train Wrecks” in our history.

What he did was equivalent to Captain Sullivan, who saved all his passengers when his plane had to ditch in the Hudson River.

What was really fascinating was that his fireman, who jumped to safety, was injured and awarded $5.00 to cover them! Yes that’s five dollars!

Casey Jones’ house was very interesting and the photos show the furniture was from the original home.

 


Sailboat to Motor Home

Day Six June 9

 

Yesterday was a busy day with good things and only one slight problem.

Our fresh water seems to have disappeared. Can’t see any leaks.

At this point the only reason may be that the water pump was left on accidently and it was heard for a while until a stop could be made to correct.

It should become clear at the pump out station later today!

 

From time to time observations comparing life aboard our sailboat and the new experience with the motor home have been made.

That is the basic purpose of starting this series.

One very large observation in regards to the serenity of sailing, versus the almost constant fight with traffic!

I have driven a considerable amount compared to most. At one time, I even drove Can-Am Race Cars at over 200MPH in competition. Some years back, I crisscrossed the country on several occasions on photo assignments.

However, wrestling, the 23 foot motor home through inconsiderate drivers on crowded interstate exchanges, coupled with sometimes confusing lane changes, as opposed to blissfully sailing miles and miles of EMPTY Open Ocean, is just no comparison!

That being said, the many opportunities to visit interesting places are well worth the effort, and fortunately, there are many very polite drivers out there who do understand the plight of a motor home. In fact, so far in our experience many Big Rig drivers have been most accommodating.

I really have great respect for those of you driving the big Class A’s and towing a car!

 

Today was the first experience with a tight winding road on a steep grade.

The visit to the Museum of Automobiles in, Morrilton, Arkansas was at the end of just such a road.

The first question asked upon arrival was “Why Here?” 

Turns out it is because the former Governor of Arkansas built it near his home to house the car collection. It just grew.

There are many more than pictured and well worth the $9 entry and drive.

Not pictured was John Kennedy’s Personal Lincoln Convertible (Not the one from Dallas in 63.) Rockefeller’s big Packard Limo and many others.

 

Yesterday someone posed the question; how is it possible for people to stay out in their RV’s so long when he could barely afford a couple weeks after saving all year.  

Tomorrow I will address that issue both from a sailboat and motor home standpoint.

 

MG-TD First Car I  Raced.jpgMorrilton, AR. Museum of Automobiles Model T.jpg

  

 

Sailboat to Motor Home

Day 7 June 10

 

Today, I’d like to address a question I read a while back.

Also, I hope that it is entertaining and helpful, and I realize many veteran RV’ers may find it amusing because they have already been here before.

I am mostly writing to share to my web page for my sailing friends that also are thinking of doing both.

The question was put forth by a member of Fun RV stuff on how people can afford to be out for more than 2 weeks?

I fully realize many full time and veteran RV people already have the answer.

Mine is more based on experience sailing as well as previous experience with a Volkswagen Westfailia.  Yes, like most reading this, I’ve done tents.

Spending 3 months on the road in the Volkswagen is a real challenge, but it’s cheap!

I guess that’s why they were so popular with the Hippie Set!

While tent camping and traveling as a photographer in the VW, you discover things nobody tells you.

Like, you can shower at KOA for a buck (may be more now).

You can also pay to shower and do laundry at most major truck stops, like Pilot, even if you don’t drive big rigs. Make friends with a trucker and you learn much about life on the road.

Still, the cost adds up, fuel cost being the most prevalent.

We have already spent almost as much as two months’ rent on a slip in a marina just for gas alone.

However the average house payment has topped $1,000 a month for most people, so unless it is going to be a short vacation, that money can be used to defray cost.

When I decided to retire early, I sold my house. A better option would have been to rent it for the payments plus enough to maintain it.

In my defense, I was planning to leave the country on my sailboat.

How we are keeping our cost down currently is by taking advantage of the many free camping sites. Many are unimproved without utilities.

We have much the same situation on the boat. The motor home has a gen-set that will take care of Air Conditioning, refrigeration and all the 110 AC electric needs, but uses fuel. Our boat has no Generator. We use an inverter (Full Sine Wave Model) and a bank of deep cycle batteries on the boat. They are recharged by solar and running the auxiliary diesel engine.

We are in the process of adding a small inverter to our motor home.

Please note: I don’t like to use RV as we are not recreating.

The sailboat uses the sails, mostly, to travel which, so far, the wind is still free!

So, the main cost for sailboats is going to be food as one can still anchor for free in many places. The boat, like our motor home, has everything needed to stay fed and clean, oh yes and potty!

So, where to get funds for cruising whether in a motor home or sailboat?

If one is not at the retirement age, or not independently wealthy, which is many, the idea is trade one expense for the other.

The money that went for a house payment is going into what boaters call a cruising kitty.

From there, the next step is to find a way to keep other expenses to a minimum.

Next blog will deal with some ideas for that.

 

 

Sailboat to Motor Home

Day 8 June 11

Today’s travels we connected with visiting old friends and places in Bentonville Arkansas.

In 1978-1980 I lived in Bentonville, and taught in Gravatt, AR.

There were so many changes, the notable one was the church l attended while there. The expansion was simply unbelievable.

Don Winfield was living in Arizona when I met him, he owns a computer repair business and has transplanted to Bella Vista, Arkansas.

Late lunch was at the Table Mesa Bistro, in downtown Bentonville, and the food was just great.

Yesterday, I mentioned about finding ways to cut cost to extend a stay.

I must state right off that I’ve been retired and living on a sailboat since 2003.

In order to do so I sold my house. When I retired, my house payment was $650 per month.

Most of the people I worked with had payments of $1500-$2000!

I held my payments low, in the first place, by staying in the house I bought when I first started teaching. It was part of my long term retirement planning.

You may already be beyond this.

Still, it is a consideration one must make if this lifestyle is desired.

Let’s consider that all that is behind and one is ready to start. The same will apply for part time or vacation users.

Savings on Operation

The size and type of rig will go a long way toward the cost of operation.

This seems simple enough, but is often overlooked.

In the sailing world it is called two foot-itis.

It is the same principle in that the idea that just a little bit bigger is better.

It isn’t! What is actually needed?

 I suppose some feel the need to have a house that can be driven. I’ve been in some and yes they are nice.

They have tile floor, washer dryer, dishwashing machine, 4 slide outs that give the same room as a double wide mobile home, fabulous, and come with a $500,000 to $1,000,000 price tag.

I’m not knocking it just know there is no way (unless it is affordable with a big, big money roll).

The second is the power plant; simply put, Diesel doing the same work uses less fuel than a gas engine. Again the price tag is usually a third higher.

Used vs. new, all these considerations will determine not only the start but continued cost.

Ideally, a 40 foot diesel motor home with 4 slide outs that gets 30 miles to the gallon would be perfect, but that just isn’t going to happen.

Sales people are not your friends. Do the homework and figure out the true needs and stick to the goal.

Again, referencing sailing experience, it is well known that a person can go anywhere in the world in a 30 foot boat, and it is quite possible to travel comfortably with less.

Again, a lot depends on whether it is a family or just a couple.

It is interesting that there are Class C’s that sleep more than some Class A’s.

My ex-principal bought a 38 foot Class A for retirement and when questioned, he said they wanted a floor plan that sleeps 2, feeds 4, and drinks 6!

Ours is a 23 foot Gulfstream BT Cruiser.

Well that is enough to cogitate for a while! If all this is old hat, then just look at the photos! Thanks for listening.

 

 

 

Sailboat to Motor Home

Day 9 June 12

 

June 11 Supplementary

It was so dismal this morning that we almost stayed in Joplin, but the storm broke in time to dump the bad stuff, fill the water tank, propane, and gas tank and head to Kansas City.

Stopped in Lamar at the Jerky Outlet, and got a free ice cream with our purchase.

Was going to have lunch but instead headed for the Steamboat Arabia and arrived just one hour before closing. Tomorrow we head for Hannibal.

I hope that this morning’s blog was a help. 

 

 

Sailboat to Motor Home

Day 10 June 13

 

Eight days out and aside from replacing tires, gasoline is our major expense.

There were only 2 stops where we spent 2 days, so we’ve been on the move constantly.

That will change soon as we have some stops planned when we get further north

Today is more River History as we plan to be in Hannibal, Missouri.

The Steamboat Arabia Museum depicts our country’s dependence on riverboat traffic.

Unlike the depictions in the movies, these boats were the freight haulers of the country.

In the museum, they have displayed just a small portion of the goods headed upriver when it sank. Hundreds of necessities, saws, axes, planes, and tools of every description as well as hundred of dishes, utensils - literally a floating department store.

The cargo was so important that two of the towns that were the destination literally ceased to exist.

A visit will bring a whole new insight to all the stories from Mark Twain!

 

Hannibal is another significant historical destination, more than just Samuel Clemens’ home town.

There are a number of places to gain insight about Samuel Clemens, as well as the many other famous residents. There was a baseball star, a Senator, Titanic Survivor, and a host of others.

The Haunted House and Wax Museum, has a diorama of the Clemens family and most famous characters from the books, along with a dialog story.

Aside from all the river memorabilia, we visited to Karlocks Kars and Pop Culture.

Steven Karlock, who runs it, was involved way back with Caroll Shelby and the early racing days. I got a little stalled there.

 

23 Steamboat Arabia Museum.jpgHannibal Walk.jpg

 

Mark Twain Museum.jpgRare 59 Impala Fuel Injected.jpg

 

 

Sailboat to Motor Home

June 14

Today is National Flag Day, which was my Mother’s birthday, also President Trump’s Birthday.

Many places along our way today had special displays to honor our Flag, among them was Burger King.

Our day started at Lowe’s ® because we are still trying to find a cure for the water getting out of our tank and dripping down the side of the motor home (see photo!)

While driving enough is spilled out to notice the level in the tank.  It is defying logic.

There should be only air at the top of the tank; therefore no water should slosh out.

Still believing a weird venturi effect was going on, the edge was sealed using weather-stripping tape. It still managed to drip enough to wet the side of the RV and drip on the ground.

So we put a CORK in it for now. Will continue to investigate.

Leaving Lowe’s® we headed out for Council Bluffs, IA.

 

On the way, our only stop was for lunch in a truck parking area with no facilities.

One of the motor home perks is we have everything we need.

In Council Bluffs, we had just enough time to visit the Union Pacific Rail Road Museum.

We decided to stop for the night and had dinner at Arby’s because the Shrimp for the Shrimp Scampi is not thawed out!

I’d like to make a comment about all the corn fields we passed:

Back in 2003, when I did a kayak trip from Fort Benton, Montana to Saint Louis, Missouri there was not near as many corn farms.

Corn yields about $1,100 an acre now, up roughly about $500 an acre in 2003.

Most of it is used today to pollute our gasoline with ethanol which has no effect whatsoever on producing clean air.   

Mixing 10% ethanol decreases fuel mileage. 15% destroys the car’s fuel system unless it is designed for “Flex Fuel”

It consumes more energy to produce than it gives. In short we’ve been sold a bill of goods. However, government subsidies fuel the production.

 

Fresh Water Fill.jpg  Put a Cork in it.jpg

 

 

 

Sailboat to Motor Home

June 15

Friday and anticipating traffic, we headed out to our first stop, the Lewis and Clark Overlook.

In 2003, during my kayak trip, I passed through on my way to Saint Louis, MO.

Our next stop was the Sergeant Floyd Monument that was up river about 5 Miles.

Sergeant Floyd (and to find out is a distant relative to our former landlord, Walter “Butch” Floyd) was the only member of the expedition that died.

Speculation continues to this day as the cause of his death. Many speculate it was Appendicitis; however, there is no way anyone knows for sure.

Lewis and Clark also stopped at his gravesite on the way back to Saint Louis.

We wanted to stop at the Lewis and Clark interpretive center but the roads were all torn up and it was impassable.

When I did my kayak trip, I hiked the 4 or so miles up a trail to get to the Sergeant Floyd Monument. A security guard watched my kayak and all my stuff while I made the trip.

 

So far, we have missed a bunch of campgrounds due to closures, late arrival due to traffic jams, or just plain bad timing. 

We have come to regard Wal-Mart ®, Pilot-Flying J®, and Love’s® Truck and Travel Stops as our new home.

On the boat we would select a quiet cove and drop anchor. Other than the quiet, it is not much different.

Guest slips with water and electricity usually run about $1 a foot. That’s $37 a night for our boat.

Many camp sites run close to the same for us and we have found some from Free (no facilities), to (so far) the $25 a night in Chattanooga where we had the water tank fixed.

 

 sargeant Floyd.jpg

 

 

Sailboat to Motor Home

June 16

Saturday morning starts out with some coffee, mostly to collect our thoughts and plan the day’s excursion.

After consulting MaxineTM, we struck out for Oacoma, SD, with a stop in Mitchell.

Mitchell was for the Corn Palace and a stop at Dollar Tree®.

The history and explanation of the Corn Castle was informative and we met some people that were from Bentonville, Arkansas where we were a few days ago.

 

Little tip here;

Dollar Tree® carries milk in a carton that needs no refrigeration until opened.

It comes in whole, 2% milk, and nonfat varieties.

In 2003, during my kayak trip down the Missouri River, I brought a number of cartons.

 

Arriving in Oacoma, South Dakota, the first stop was to the Akta Lakota Museum.

My Grandmother was Santee-Sioux.

This visit had much meaning for me and Dawn is getting a rundown of the kayak trip I made before we met.

I look out at the peaceful river just outside my motor home and remember dragging my kayak up to camp in a clump of trees near where we are parked today.

We had dinner at Al’s Oasis, Dawn had a Buffalo Burger and I had what they call Chislic Basket which consists of what would be squares of beef that are dipped into a BBQ sauce with fries and Cole Slaw.

We are staying a couple of days.

 

81 Maxine.jpg

61 Camped In Oacoma SD.png

 

Diorama Akta Lakota Museum.jpg

 

 

Sailboat to Motor Home

June 17

Along the Missouri River in South Dakota!

We are camped and we are planning to stay for a few days.

It will be interesting to see how things work dry camping. The last experience was with a 1986 Volkswagen Westfailia and they are quite limited. Our Class C is a luxury condo by comparison.

I know that I will be making some modifications such as adding a small inverter to handle the computer and other small requirements without running the generator.

My sailboat has a 2,600 watt full sine wave one but it must also power the refrigerator as well as the other AC requirements out to sea.

The sailboat does not have a generator.

The dual refrigerator is a great boon for us as the propane consumption is so much more efficient than our compressor model in the boat.

 

The Missouri River and I go back to May 22, 2003, when I launched my home built kayak from Fort Benton, Montana and headed to Saint Louis Missouri.

The trip was an early retirement present to myself.

This trip was a chance to revisit some of the places and to share with my partner some of the places that were stops along the way.

The weather took a sudden cooling trend and it is only 70 now but actually feels cooler. Perhaps those Florida summers spoiled us!

 

Kayak With Solar.jpg

 

Volkswagen Camper.jpg

 

 

Sailboat to Motor Home

June 18

This is the second day camped next to the Missouri River, and time for some reflections.

Sailboat to Motor Home started as a comparison to two different lifestyles.

The similarities are more apparent as time is spent traveling in the motor home.

Travel Trailers, 5th Wheels, Motor Homes, Sailboats, and larger Power Boats all have one main ingredient, the ability to have freedom of choice.

Unlike a landlocked abode, roaming to new destinations is eventually the goal.

Some people opt to make it a full time living arrangement.

Some prefer the security of continuing to keep a permanent home while traveling.

Either way each offers a unique set of travel opportunities and restrictions.

I personally wanted both for some time and now that goal is fulfilled.

 

Today I share some graphic illustrations. Some in this group may have already experienced both a boat and RV!

I have avoided the term RV because for us and others like us, our full time home either floats or is on wheels.

Dawn, my Partner and Admiral, said our motor home was like a small apartment.

That’s true and our sailboat is like a larger apartment.

I know that larger motor homes will have much more as do larger boats.

Our sailboat is 37 feet and our Class C is 23 feet. Both offer us all we need to enjoy our travels in reasonable comfort and convenience.

Both have a complete galley, and our Class C has a Microwave. We have not had a Micro Wave for 5 years now as the boat does not have one.

Sleeping accommodations for the Class C we own is 2; the sailboat can have up to 7 if everyone is very friendly, however, for practical purposes 4 in a pinch 5. However I am sure a 37 foot motor home would be equal.

 

We have plenty of storage in both and our Class C, and boat.

Actually the Class C has a larger refrigerator.

I must state that refrigeration is one of the differences where the motor home industry has boats beat.

Refrigerators on boats must use the compressor type which draws much more power than the gas used in the motor home.

The power on our boat will die in about 2 days if a way to recharge is not found.

Unlike our motor home we do not have a generator on the boat and must depend on an inverter for all AC power out to sea. Many of the newer boats do have a Gen-Set, also air conditioning!

Most sailboats over 25 feet have a small engine. Ours is a Diesel 45 HP with a 100 AMP generator which will recharge the house batteries. Many equip the boats with solar panels.

Many motor homes also have solar panels and we hope to do so as well soon.

 

Dealing with sewage is pretty much the same.

Both motor home and sailboat is equipped with holding tanks for that purpose.

Motor homes must find a dump site, and some may charge. Most of the charges we have found were $10 or less.

Boats, however must be pumped out.  Many marinas and most mooring services have a pump out. It is more expensive than RV dumps because it is more complicated.

Marathon, down in the Florida Keys, include pump out in the charge for mooring a boat.

 

Last, the service dinghy and tow vehicle.

Many tow a car behind the motor home, and the ones with 5th wheels or Travel Trailers can detach the tow vehicle while camped.

Neither system is frightfully convenient, however, it works.

We have opted to sell our car and go it alone as the 23 foot size is not terrible to maneuver in traffic and park.

On the sailboat it is absolutely necessary to have some kind of service dinghy.

It is fairly impossible to swim with an armful load of groceries!

There are many other necessary things to transport to shore, like laundry, fresh water supplies back to the boat, and, possible, even fuel if there is no fuel dock handy.

This is one area where the boat exceeds our motor home. The boat has 100 gallons of water, the Class C has 38. Again, larger ones have more.

 

A very astute sailing couple was famous for saying “Go Simple, Go Now!”

Another of my boat friends says, “Don’t Die at Your Desk!”

We have all heard similar stories, and the one that prompted me to take early retirement was my uncle who dreamed of having a cabin in the mountains, worked as a fireman all his life and died of a heart attack the day before his retirement.

I lived aboard a 24 foot sailboat for a year after retiring and selling my house to finance it all. I made do without many of the conveniences we now have and that has enabled us to appreciate the things we do have and enjoy the journey quite nicely.

Interior compared.jpg 09 2 way refrigerator.jpg 

 

Microwave (we dont have one on our boat).jpg Interior overview.jpg T V.jpg

 

 

Sailboat to Motor Home

June 19

Today started out with a problem. When unfolding the dinette the hinge bar became separated from the table. A quick trip to True-Value in Chamberlain produced real screws and some carpenters glue.

The wood mounting bracket was held in by staples which have been slowly working their way out.

Naturally, all the tools and parts we needed were back at the boat in Florida.

Now I have 4 sets of drill bits!

We had planned to stay another day, as it was peaceful, and we have no real Agenda.

We had lunch at Taco Johns and went over to the huge sculpture “Dignity” before heading to Wall, South Dakota.

 

As we crossed the Missouri River, Dawn was amazed at how big it was at this point.

There are much bigger spots where I had camped during my 2003 Kayak trip that took me out of Fort Benton, Montana.

Tonight we stopped at a Flying J and had dinner and fed the motor home.

We ate for $35, the motor home for $114 for 39 gallons.

We are getting used to that by now.

 

Dignituy Chamberlain SD.jpg  Missouri River Campsite.jpg

 

 

Sailboat to Motor Home

June 20

Today we are sitting out the rain and thunderstorm.

Originally, a trip to Mount Rushmore was planned, but due to the possibility of much nastiness, it was decided to sit it out for a day.

This gives some time to reflect over the journey, and the reason for starting this in the first place.

The premise to Motor Home or sailboat has been discussed.

I must admit that last night, just before sleep, I was tempted to try to sell my sailboat.

Two things prevent that.

The one reason I give for public consumption is that I have far too much money and effort than I could sell it for.

The other reason is that I genuinely am not ready to give up the real freedom of a sailboat.

The adventures afforded us in the motor home are legion and we have enjoyed our “land voyages” so far.

The fuel cost is actually far less than a powered boat. Dawn’s previous boat, a 50 foot Hatteras would hold 1,000 gallons and averaged 1 gallon a mile.

Our motor home holds 55 gallons and is around 10 MPG.

The sailboat actually has a small diesel that burns about one gallon per hour.

It will travel about 6.2 knots or 7.75 MPH. Under sail in good wind about 7knots or almost 9 MPH, not stellar but free!

Each has its advantages. I imagine a smaller diesel truck with one of the lightweight trailers may do better and a 40 foot diesel pusher Motor coach would do worse.

Personally I’m still going to opt for both.

Our journeys have been, for the most part, relaxing and it is very good to be on the move again.

Dawn and I are both vagabonds at heart. Two years ago we made a 3 ½ month, 7,500 mile journey in our Westfailia. Comparing, we appreciate our Class C much more and the premium for fuel has been worth the price.

The poor Volkswagen lacked some important amenities. Like heater, Air Conditioner, Generator and mostly Potty and Shower.

The Full-timer Veterans know what we are talking about and most have already gone through this stage.

Dawn and I have both camped in tents before we met and the Volkswagen Westfailia, and Sailboat together.  Even with the minor issues, we are still glad we are not in a tent.

So here are some photo highlights from our trip so far.

 

Air Museum Fayetteville Arkansas.jpg

Corn Palace and Museum South Dakota.jpg  Ford Model A Station WagonMuseum of Automobiels AR.jpg

 

Main Street Bentonville Arkansas  (Home of Wal-Mart).jpg  Next Stop.jpg

 

Hannibal Missouri Downtown (Home of Mark Twain).jpg

 

Wall Drugs.jpg

 

 

Sailboat to Motor Home

June 21

Today’s agenda includes all the housekeeping chores that were put off because of the on and off constant rain and overcrowding of the camping area.

While in Rapid City, it’s a trip to Wal-Mart for some supplies, Cabela’s to refill water and Pilot for gas and dump station.

All this before heading to Mount Rushmore.

 

Arriving at Mount Rushmore, we were greeted with a sign that announce only paid parking was available.  However normally $10, because were “old people” we got an old people discount and paid only $5.

The monument was vastly different than back in 1980-something when I was here photographing for Trail Blazer Magazine. There was only a big parking lot (no charge) and a small visitors center that sold tours to the top!

The admission is well worth it as there are great facilities, an informative movie and of course lots of tourist shops.

Even Rushmore had an Ice Cream Shoppe!

 

The Crazy Horse Memorial is a work in progress, and currently only bus tours up to the mountain are available.

The admission is a bit steeper than Rushmore.

The money however goes to not only fund continuing the project but to provide scholarships as well.

The visitor’s center is packed with history of the various nations that occupied the Black Hills and surrounding territory.

 

When we returned to Rapid City, Dawn and I had dinner at the Colonial House Restaurant.

We enjoyed a Real Buffalo Flat Iron Steak. Now all that’s left is for Dawn to experience: Native Buffalo Stew!   (Yes I’ve had all 3)

 

Mount Rushmnore.jpg  Crazy Horse Monument.jpg

 

 

Sailboat to Motor Home

June 22

Today there are thunderstorms and flash flood warnings so we are holding up in the famous Wally-World Campground.

As I continue to think in comparison between motor home and sailboat, the advantage of staying dry during the rain is a luxury I did not have on the boat.

Unless the boat is at anchor it still must be sailed even in the rain, and someone must sail it!

In the motor home, we just park it and wait out the storm, or continue driving while staying dry.

It is a lot easier to find a place to park than it is to find a safe anchorage.

Still I don’t think I am ready to give up the sailboat but really getting to love the motor home.

 

Because we are not going any place for a day or two, the photos are form some past trips.

One if by land and two if by sea.

The photos illustrate why the sailboat has one great advantage, it can travel to islands.

The Volkswagen is a 1986 and I’ve had it since the early 90’s.

It was destroyed during Hurricane Irma.

I must admit its replacement is far better! 

 

 

Sailboat to Motor Home

June 23

Today we elected to stay one more day at Wally World Campground Club in Rapid City, SD, mostly for a break and allow the weather to settle down some.

Those following this, that are in the process of considering travel by motor home, it is hopeful that there will be useful information.

Those veterans please keep from laughing too hard!

 

The aim is for those contemplating starting a full time situation will have different needs than a part timer.

Sailboat (or powerboat) or motor home (Travel Trailer or 5th wheel) all will require some way to do business, get mail, and generally have some kind of residence.

I sold my house in 2002, but did not discover how to set all that up until 2006. Up to that time I worked out of a UPS Mail Stop in my hometown of San Bernardino, California.

This ceased to work when it came time to renew car insurance.

“We can’t insure at a post office box!”

There may be troubles in banking as well, so upon advice from another full timer,  I opened an account with Saint Brendon’s Isle, Green Cove Springs, FL 32043.

They provide an actual street address and a host of other services including forwarding to anywhere in the world.  I have used them since 2006.

Sadly, the “Patriot Act” interferes with many things, and even though it was supposed to “Go Away” and it is a useless piece of legislation, the idiots in Washington preserved it!

 

This concludes my entry for today, and yes I have contemplated selling the sailboat, and dealt with that in another post.

The photos today are from my general collection that I just happen to have on my computer.

 

 

Sailboat to Motor Home

June 24

It’s RAINING again.  We are sailors first so schedules mean nothing.

Sitting out weather is not an issue for us at all.

I will take the time to elaborate on the transition from Sailboat to Motor Home.

After a month of use, it is now possible to accurately evaluate.

One issue is the difference in the ages of the boat and motor home respectively.

Our Sailboat is a 1981 Endeavour 37, and the Motor Home is a 2004 Gulfstream BT Cruiser 23.

Starting off, I know that an equivalent year Sailboat would probably have similar conveniences.

The other issue is price.

To be honest, we scored a relatively good deal on both the boat and Motor Home, just under $19,000 for the Motor Home and $15,000 for the Sailboat.

At the time I bought the Endeavour 37, it was listed from $49,000 to $79,000, depending on condition. The BT Cruiser was just reduced in price and we had looked at one that was a 2003 for about $23,000. We not only liked the price but the layout of the one we bought. Also, Camping world tagged on $1900 that guaranteed all systems to be in working order and replacement of any defective part, device, or appliance as necessary.

After 3 years of rebuilding our boat, that was quite welcome.

Today still the advertised price for an Endeavour 37 is 40 to 50K, however, a new 37 foot sailboat will run around $280 -350,000. Probably an equal size Motor Home will be about the same.

 

So how are things stacking up?

It has been so convenient so far, to hot? Push a button - set the thermostat and it’s cool within minutes. Too cold - move the switch on the thermostat to heat and it’s warm!

The generator must be running to use the microwave, or the shore power must be attached (notice even motor homes call it “shore power.”)

The refrigerator will operate on Propane or Electric and automatically switches to whatever is available. It can operate for weeks on gas!

On our boat, we have no microwave or built in generator.

Heating and Air Conditioning are portable units. They must be installed and removed as needed. Also, they must be stored onboard or on shore when not in use. The heater is small (Mr. Buddy Propane Catalyst) but the air conditioner large, (LG Portable 10,000 BTU.)

The refrigerator must be a compressor model because the boat may stay healed over on one tack long enough for a gas model to stop functioning. On Battery power, we get 2 maybe 3 days. There are other solutions to this issue, some use an engine driven “cold plate” that must be charged twice a day. However, none match the convenience of the motor home unit.

 

All the other things are similar if not the same. The toilet and shower facilities, gray and black water storage and disposal are similar.

Stove and oven are the same units except on a sailboat the stove-oven unit is gimbaled to stay level when the boat rocks.

Sleeping accommodations are similar depending on model and length.

 

Traveling in a motor home vs. sailboat

 

The sailboat can go farther for less and is able to have over sea destinations.

Once a destination is reached, transportation on land is an issue as there is no way to tow a vehicle behind a boat. We have learned to use public transportation but often times it is problematic at best. Many shore facilities will have some necessities such as Laundromat, nearby shopping, and possibly even interesting restaurants.

Some worry about storms, however two things to remember is the boat can take more that you can, and with a little preparation, everything can be handled without damage.

I’ve been through 4 hurricanes, 2 docked.  The worst was docked when Irma came through.

The Motor Home is actually more flexible in travels, and in our case will provide transportation upon arrival.

Storms are less worrisome as it is possible to move out of harm’s way.

Cost is still a factor, as fuel cost may limit the travels.

Campsites and dockage are close in price. However most marinas charge by the foot!

As stated earlier, still I’m not ready to give up our sailboat, but we are extremely happy we have the opportunity have the choice.

 

 

Sailboat to Motor Home

June 25

Today was a day of Chores and Travel.

Boat or RV the same things must be done.

On the Sailboat, the holding tanks must be pumped out at a marina or pumping station.

Yes, it literally must be pumped as the tanks are below decks and the outlet is above decks.

Some boats have a macerator but there are very strict regulations for the use.

Fresh Water fill is the same. The boat holds 100 gallons the motor home 38!

The motor home dumps by gravity so all that is needed is a place.

We filled the water tank before we left Rapid City, and topped off the fuel.

We only made 2 stops on the way to Billings for shopping.

Tomorrow we will go to the Little Big Horn Battlefield. After that ????

Stay tuned for further adventures.

 

 

Sailboat to Motor Home

June 26

Today, the Little Big Horn Battlefield Memorial and possibly Yellowstone is the agenda.

I wish to thank all the people responding and the great comments about the blog.

I stated the idea at the beginning, to compare our sailboat experience to our Motor Home.

There have been a number of people that have responded that they also once had a boat.

Like a number of others, we took an early retirement and decided to abandon our house and take to the road (or sea!)

Looking back, the idea of selling my house may not have been the best idea.

Today the house would be free and clear and be providing income to help finance our adventures, and if necessary provide a residence if we became infirmed.

I promised to discuss financing the adventure, and probably one of the safest is using real-estate investments. Advance planning in this area a few years before retirement helps.

In my defense, I opted to sell the house because I was not planning to stay in the United States.

I had planned a very extended trip to South America, however, about two weeks after signing the papers and agreeing to a month’s free rent I was involved in a hit and run accident that literally put me out of commission for the rest of 2002 and part of 2003.

So, finally in 2003 I moved the sailboat to Marana, Arizona and started down the Missouri River in my home built kayak!

 

 

Sailboat to Motor Home

June 27

Today is just some scenery as we are in transit to Cody, Wyoming, as our probable destination but on the way will visit the Smoke Jumper School in Missoula, MT, because in 66 and 67 I was one!

It has been a month of ownership and almost a month traveling in the Motor Home.

We have lived aboard a Sailboat for 15 years on and off!

So, I now feel qualified to mention the little inconveniences.

Things you don’t deal with in a HOUSE!

  1. There is actually room to turn around in the shower.
  2. There is more than ENOUGH hot water!
  3. The water tank does not have to be refilled ever 3 or 4 days
  4. The beds do not get disassembled each day so you can have breakfast.

 

Now for the advantages and this applies to boat or RV!

 

  1. You don’t mow the lawn any more.
  2. Neighbors don’t get on your nerves anymore (you can leave).
  3. The scenery changes frequently.
  4. The tax collector has forgotten your name.

 

The reality is, still, with all the little inconveniences we think life is better now.

As stated earlier, we are not yet ready to give up the Sailboat, but we sure enjoy the dickens out of our motor home. We are also meeting some really nice people as a side benefit.

 

 

Sailboat to Motor Home

June 28

Just about all the differences between Life aboard a Sailboat and Motor Home have been exposed by now.

Today the history:

Early RV’s; 1717, the Invention of the Conestoga wagon provided for the expansion of the population westward.

Average Conestoga wagon was 18 feet long, 11 feet high, 4 feet wide and carried up to 12,000 pounds.

Powered by a special breed of large draft horses, and not exactly a Recreational Vehicle, it was an early Motor Home.

Vardo Wagon (Gypsy Wagon) 1850, generally used as a home for British Romani People, often traveled in caravans.

 

Today’s travels were the Smokejumper Museum, Montana Air Museum, Fort Missoula Museum, and Missoula Heritage Museum.

Missoula Military Museum Fort Missoula.jpg  Montana Heritage Museum Artifacts.jpg

 

smokejumper tour.jpg

 

 

Sailboat to Motor Home

June 29

Today Is Sailboat History Time! Yesterday was Motor Home!

Our prototype sailor was Joshua Slocum 1844-1909 First Solo Navigation Around the World.

His boat was a 36 foot Gaff Rig Sloop named Spray.

The closest to us was Lin and Larry Pardey who built and sailed the Seraffyn, an engineless Cutter Rig Channel Cutter, designed by Lyle Hess.

They spent a few years traveling and then built the 29 foot Taleisin, also, a Cutter designed by Lyle Hess, also with no engine.

newenglandboating.com/dropping-in-on-seraffyn/

Many people, like ourselves, after reading about these adventures set out on various sailboats.

 

Today’s stop is Superior, Montana. Beautiful Alpine Village town surrounded by pine covered hillsides.

We had a great dinner at Durango’s. The special today was Prime Rib, and there was enough to bring back for Prime Rib sandwiches tomorrow. ‘

I am nearing the end of our Sailboat to Motor Home series and will start a new heading tomorrow.

Tonight, I will think on the title. So, a Thank You! to all who have read and commented.

 

23 Clark Fork River Superior Montana.jpg Dinner at Durangos Superior Montana.jpg Superior Coarthouse.jpg

 

 

Sailboat to Motor Home

June 30

Today is the last day for this series and tomorrow will start new with the new month.

Also, today was mostly a lazy day while waiting for the propane dealer to open Monday.

Superior has the Clark Fork River running through the middle of town. Named for William Clark of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, it flows some 310 miles into the Columbia River.

Just before my kayak trip down the Missouri River, I read a book titled “River Horse” by William Least Heat-Moon about his journey from New Orleans to the Pacific Ocean in a small power boat. He traveled through here on his journey as did Lewis and Clark.

Above the Interstate next to the rail line, the view of the city is shrouded by the rows of pine trees growing along the road.

Traffic on the Interstate is rather slight compared to what we are used to! Very Peaceful.

Go Back

Comment

Visit our other websites

   

Blog Search

Comments

There are currently no blog comments.